Saturday, August 9, 2008

“Winds of Change” the new CD by Airborne the “Musical Peacemakers” of Contemporary Jazz sends out an Inspirational Message of Hope

Airborne has just released another CD “Winds of Change” on Tilt Records. The band is still riding high on the wonderful success of last years 2007 release of “Turbulence”. The New CD “Winds of Change” is coming out at an unsettled time in history. Wartime, a important election year, a world in turmoil, a broken economy, and people making decisions based on fear.

The band explains that the title, compositions, and even the emotion of this new project show their concern on all these matters of importance. We are musicians, but with deep humanitarian thoughts. The world needs to change and to take action. But we must be unified first. We hope you enjoy our new music and that it helps in this cause. Be Well, Be Happy, and really enjoy Life. But remember to Reach out your hand and ride the Winds of Change.

“Winds of Change" is the 6th CD from Airborne, the multi-cultural contemporary jazz group from New Haven, CT USA. Airborne the proclaimed “Musical Peacemakers” of contemporary jazz are focusing their talents in a harmonious atmosphere for change. Their music transfigures a spirit of love and compassion for our fellow brothers and sisters. Echo’s a message to humanity that it is time to turn the page for the sake of our future generations.

The world is finally traveling on the winds of change. Many discoveries and efforts have been made to make us all aware of the dangers that peril our planet and its children. Many wonderful people have already dedicated their lives for this important change. But their deeds must have everyone’s support, help, and blessing.

Projects for Global Warming, Hunger, Natural Disasters, New Energy Resources, and Economical Distress have been created. All these concerns and factors have stressed our earth to its boiling point. The time is now for change and to take action. Without prejudice we must all stand together to achieve peace and global unity to take on these most difficult tasks.


We must reach out our hands to the world. We can make this earth a better place to live. No matter what faith, race, color, or wealth you have. We are all children of this world. Help save our planet and its children! Reach out your hand and ride the Winds of Change!

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Airborne - Interview – Smoothjazz.com

How long has the band been playing together?

The band was formed in 1988. This year 2008 we will be celebrating our 20th anniversary. Wow! 20 years…my, my, my, when did those years go by? The band has even survived all the ups and downs of being musicians. I can honestly say that the years have been very rewarding to us. To live a life of music is a wonderful experience and a precious gift. To continue working with these amazing musicians is an honor.

Would you please share a few highlights from the years together?

We love the process of each new recording project and release. The intervention of ideas, the collaboration of musicians, creating the jazz sound that is Airborne today. Bringing life and love to each new composition. Keeping faith and watching the growth in the band’s material and popularity.

Recording and producing for other artists in genres as Gospel, Jazz, and R&B.

To perform at jazz festivals, concerts, and clubs with different jazz artists and groups. To share words, thoughts, stories, and just to listen to musicians from all over the world. Music is truly an international language.

Where is the band based and how does your location factor into your music?

We are from New Haven, CT, USA. Tri-State Area - Urban based. I guess you can call us city dwellers. There is a magic in the city that absorbs many musical art forms. The sounds of the city are cool but hot. Influences of Jazz, R&B, Latin and Blues are all around you capturing your inner emotions.

We also have a passion for the music of the Caribbean. When someone asks what kind of music we do we tell them contemporary jazz with an island passion and urban emotion. Picture the band performing jazz on a street corner shaded by a palm tree.

You refer to yourselves as a "multi-cultural" jazz band... how come?

Our hometown of New Haven is very rich in ethic and cultural diversity. Each member is unique and brings these diversities and backgrounds to create the jazz sound. Airborne has been praised as being a living spirit of musical brotherhood. The love of jazz is shared by many cultures.

Can you give us an idea of how deep the band's commitment is to the recording arts and education?

We do support the Arts. We are on the New England Foundation for the Arts and the CT Commission on the Arts performing arts touring rosters. We bring “A Century of Jazz” an Arts in Education program into the schools. A demonstration of a variety of jazz forms and styles, supported by a historic narration, a musical insight, a question
and answer session, and an inspirational workshop.

This program instills a positive attitude and direction towards musical and social growth. The no limits approach combined with a structured musical lesson plan illustrates the value of jazz education in our society.

Jazz Education is very vital for our newer generations. Teaching thoughts of imagination, personal expression, and self discipline to help them achieve whatever goals they dream. Emotions soar high in young hearts and jazz music gently provides an enrichment and fulfillment to their wandering passion. Jazz is a true American art form.

Your latest CD is called Winds of Change.. On the surface this may appear to be an endorsement of Barrack Obama, but it's referring to much more than this isn't it?

The New CD Winds of Change is coming out at an unsettled time in history. Wartime, a important election year, a world in turmoil, a bad economy, and people making decisions based on fear.

The title, compositions, and even the emotion of this new project show our concern on all these matters of global importance. We are musicians, but with deep humanitarian thoughts. We are not politicians, just a voice that they the politicians should be hearing. The world needs to change and we need to take action. But we must be unified first. We hope you enjoy our new music and that it helps in the cause to bring people together, so that change can be made. Our message is very simple, Learn to Love, Hold on to Hope, Dare to Dream, and Live in Peace. So Be Well, Be Happy, and really enjoy Life. But remember to Reach out your hand and ride the Winds of Change.

Winds of Change is our 6th CD on Tilt Records. Airborne has been graciously proclaimed as the “Musical Peacemakers” of Contemporary Jazz. Maybe because we are focusing our talents we have been blessed with in a harmonious atmosphere for change. We are trying to have our music transfigure a spirit of love and compassion for our fellow brothers and sisters. To echo a strong athemn to humanity that it is time to turn the page for the sake of our future generations.

The world is finally traveling on the winds of change. Many discoveries and efforts have been made to make us all aware of the dangers that peril our planet and its children. Many wonderful people have already dedicated their lives for this important change. But their deeds must have everyone’s support, help, and blessing.

Projects for Global Warming, Hunger, Natural Disasters, New Energy Resources, and Economical Distress have been created. All these concerns and factors have stressed our earth to its boiling point. The time is now for change and to take action seriously. Without prejudice we must all stand together to achieve peace and global unity to take on these most difficult tasks.

We must reach out our hands to the world. We can make this earth a better place to live. No matter what faith, race, color, or wealth you have. We are all children of this world. We must help save our planet and its children! I urge everyone to Reach out your hand and ride the Winds of Change!

Airborne - Interview by Joe Montague for Jazz Police / Riveting Riffs

Interview by Joe Montague for Jazz Police / Riveting Riffs (www.rivetingriffs.com) ©

Music for Turbulent Times

Turbulence is a word one normally associates with a rough airplane ride or you hear on a weather report, but it is also the name of the outstanding CD released in August of this year by the New England based jazz group Airborne. In September 2007, I had the opportunity to speak with Thomas and Gregory Borino, the two brothers, who along with lifelong friend Thomas Sansone founded the group twenty years ago. Each one of the three, play several instruments on the album. In addition, they produced, engineered and mixed the project themselves.

In describing what the listener will hear when they don their headphones, earbuds or pump up the volume on their speakers, Gregory Borino says, “They are going to get hit with a lot. There will be some light, smooth mellow stuff, but on some of the endings (to the songs), we are really rocking it out quite a bit. The listener will also hear a big band piece, solos and improv, because improvisation is still an important part of what we do. They will hear a CD that has an edge to it.”

Thomas Borino adds, “You can still tell it is us, even though there are a lot of different kinds of music. We definitely captured an Airborne Sound on this CD.”

“While the songs are different, they are not all over the place. There is a consistency. If you listen to the CD from track one to track nine, it is not like you are thinking, ‘Where did this come from?’ The CD does flow from song to song,” says Gregory.

Gregory who engineered and mixed the CD jokes that it aged him by ten years. “There are a lot of tracks, and we had to make them fit into two little speakers, that took some time. The arrangements are well thought out. We didn’t just bang something out. Everything was listened to, listened to again, and again and again,” he says.

“Festival At Sunset,” is the opening track for Turbulence, and immediately Thomas Borino’s strong keyboarding, Ahser Delerme’s Latin percussion and Laco Deczi’s trumpet transport you to a tropical setting. The song’s upbeat tempo is appealing and each chord bears a smile. The guitars (Gregory Borino) start with mellower riffs, but as the song builds to a crescendo, the fretwork becomes a little edgier. Thomas Sansone, Donte Hall and Elizabeth Dellinger deliver smooth background vocalese.

Commenting on Airborne’s ability to combine the smoother elements of jazz and Latin vibes, without the later dominating the melody and groove, Gregory says, “We also need to give credit to our percussionist Asher Delerme. He is a very smart player. He doesn’t just play a part, he is very intense. When he has a part in the recording process, it is there for a reason. That’s why it is not overbearing.”

Thomas makes the point that although they have lived their lives in the city, that he and Gregory have a heart for the Latin countries, their people and cultures. He believes that strong connection genuinely infuses the Latin vibes heard in Airborne’s music.

While admitting to several other influences in their music, Gregory echoes his brother’s sentiments as it relates to the Latin grooves in Airborne’s music. While attending Boston’s Berklee College of Music, Gregory was in a Latin jazz band, and one might say it was love at first listen, as he was enthralled with the emphasis on percussion instruments. Describing the music as positive, passionate and alive, he feels that Airborne’s interpretation of Latin rhythms creates an upbeat environment in which people can leave the stresses of their day behind. Certainly, the band’s use of Afro Cuban and Brazilian rhythms keeps listeners’ feet moving and their bodies swaying.

It’s “Smooth Sailing” for Airborne

As strong as the Latin rhythms are in Airborne’s music, Gregory says that R&B also has a prominent place. Thomas agrees, “Like Gregory said, we always have been fans of R&B, going back to Motown. That allowed us to cross over to non-jazz lovers.

Turbulence had been out barely a month, at the time of my conversation with the Borino brothers, but they were already receiving positive reviews and heavy demand for their music, from places as far flung as the United Kingdom and Australia. On the home front, college radio stations have been burning up the airwaves with cuts from Turbulence, and in particular the first single to be released, “Smooth Sailing.” In part, they attribute the positive response to Airborne’s ability to be genre busters.

“We cross over a lot of different formats, and like Gregory was saying, we have an edge. We don’t play it safe. A lot of artists try to work with a mellow formula that (fits a) smooth jazz format (noting that he is not dissing smooth jazz artists). On our CD, we do a lot of variations. We play a big band swing tune, a contemporary piece that is a tribute to the American Indians and an African piece,” says Thomas. You can say we are a jazz, contemporary jazz and a smooth jazz group. We are musicians.

Thomas says, “We named it (the CD) Turbulence, because there is a lot of confusion in the world, and because it is wartime. Our music is not going to be a solution, but maybe it can be a wakeup call for peace. We have tried to convey that through our music. It is not an answer, but we hope it is something that wakes people up. The world needs a little bit of global unity. We tried to give our music a soothing feel.”

At the same time, Gregory wants to make sure that the listening public clearly understands how Airborne perceives their role, and what their music is trying to accomplish. “We are first and foremost musicians, not politicians, but we are also smart, educated and humanitarian people. If in some way, we can bring a little change that is fine. We are not hard, revolutionary type of musicians. We are not the Bob Dylans or Joan Baezs of the sixties.

Thomas adds, “We try to keep the politics out of the music and make it a message of love.”

Today, Thomas and Gregory Borino still enjoy listening to the music of musicians who originally inspired them. For Gregory, who plays both electric and acoustic guitars he was first attracted to the music of guitarists who are now considered to be icons, people like Carlos Santana, Pat Metheny, Larry Carlton and Lee Ritenour. Thomas lists pianist / composer Chick Corea as a major influence, referring to his compositions as “amazing,” and to Corea as “a legend.” He has also been inspired by the music of Herbie Hancock and George Duke.

Airborne - Interview - Susan Francis - Jazz Review

Artist Interview by: Susan Frances – Jazz Review

Airborne --Authentically Multi-Cultured – Musical Peacemakers

The six-man and one-woman contemporary jazz/world music ensemble Airborne, who call the heart of New Haven, Connecticut their home, are setting course for a tour in support of their latest release Turbulence from Tilt Records. Formed in 1988, Airborne is comprised of seven musicians who respect each others individuality and musical diversity which ranges from Latin, African, and Caribbean influences to R&B, soul, Gospel, and smooth jazz palates.

Core members Thomas Borino on piano, Greg Borino on guitars, and Thomas Sansone on saxophone expanded the trio into a sextet with the addition of bassist Steven Clarke, drummer Dean Kosh, and percussionist Asher Delerme for the band’s debut album Take Off in 1990. The band proceeded as a 6-piece through their follow up albums which included Across The Sky in 1995 and Lifetones in 1999. The band added a new element into the mix in 2004 when singer/percussionist Lady Elizabeth Dellinger joined Airborne for the recordings of their fourth studio album Heavy Vibes and on their current release Turbulence.

The band is excited about coming into their 20th year together in 2008, still feeling good about their enterprising sound and making a difference across the globe and in their own corner of the world. The band discusses their involvement in community arts programs as well as how their music has grown in the last twenty years. Airborne’s music is as multi-cultured as ever with an authenticity that takes the listener to the place of its origins. Its members are as autonomous as always with reverence for each others musical diversity as they bring it all together into a floral musical collage.

Jazzreview: What was the recording process like for Turbulence?

Airborne: The recording process usually starts with a composition and arrangement that is written by either Thomas Borino, Thomas Sansone or Greg Borino. The other musicians then add their talent and musical thoughts to the song. No one is ever told what to play. Each musicians input has created the jazz sound that is Airborne.

Jazzreview: How did the song “Drums Of Peace” from Turbulence come together?

Airborne: Thomas Sansone wrote and played that haunting melodic saxophone on this interesting music piece. The chants in ‘Drums Of Peace’ are actually from a few African dialects. The chants proclaim ‘Listen to the drums of peace,’ ‘Awake the peace,’ and ‘Peace of the World.’ Authentic African drums and rhythms beat to the cry of that continent.

Jazzreview: How was the arrangement for the track “Can’t Fight Love” decided?

Airborne: Thomas Borino wrote, arranged and sang on this funky duet with Elizabeth Dellinger. Our R&B roots from childhood come out in this tune. We grew up listening to soul and Motown as well as jazz. The band is blessed with vocal abilities both male and female. This crosses us over to non-jazz lovers, especially in a live venue where a classic R&B tune can put a place on fire.

Jazzreview: How did you meet Lady Elizabeth Dellinger and how did she become a member of Airborne?

Airborne: Elizabeth was a close friend of guitarist Greg Borino. They performed and co-wrote together in various situations for over 15 years. She became an official member during the recording of the Heavy Vibes CD in 2004. But she did perform with the band prior to that CD also. She has brought her wonderful voice and talent of vocal arrangements into the mix of the group.

Jazzreview: Does the band use any music technology for the recordings?

Airborne: In the studio, we use Steinberg products. They are great programs and offer much to enhance the music. All the music on Turbulence is actually played.

Jazzreview: Why did Airborne decide to go with a big band sound for the song “Hillside Swing”?

Airborne: ‘Hillside Swing’ was a challenge and it took a lot of tracks, time and listening. But we are all very happy with the result.

Jazzreview: What are some of the themes of the songs on Turbulence?

Airborne: Our world is overwhelmingly filled with physical, emotional, political and economical distress, disaster, and confusion. That you can say is turbulence. We are not saying that music is a solution. The answers are found in our society, in that awareness and attitudes (which) are very important factors for everyone. The message we want to convey is that we can all make a difference in this world of need. If we try to help, support, and mostly understand. Only then can we find and achieve peace and global unity. I guess the message is love.

Jazzreview: What was the impetus for making Turbulence?

Airborne: Turbulence is one of those projects where everything just lined up and worked. There was a special enthusiasm in each musician. I guess you can say there was no Heavy Vibes in the recording, pun intended. That was our last CD. We recorded and produced this one. I think the compassion we have for this music is ever present in this recording.

Jazzreview: How is Turbulence different from Airborne‘s previous albums?

Airborne: Our first 3 CD’s were mostly instrumental. The Heavy Vibes and Turbulence added our percussionist and vocalist (Elizabeth Dellinger). We do think Turbulence is our best yet. We are very happy with the compositions, arrangements and sound quality, and the message it represents.

Jazzreview: Why does the band gravitate to Island and Latin accents in your music?

Airborne: We are from New Haven, Connecticut, USA, Tri-State Area, urban based. I guess you can call us city dwellers. There is a magic in the city that absorbs many musical art forms. The sounds of the city are cool but hot. Influences of jazz, R&B, Latin, and blues are all around you, capturing your inner emotions. We also have a passion for the music of the Caribbean. When someone asks what kind of music we do, we tell them contemporary jazz with an island passion and urban emotion. Picture the band performing jazz on a street corner shaded by a palm tree.

Jazzreview: When did the band members first come together?

Airborne: The band was formed in 1988. This year 2008, we will be celebrating our 20th Anniversary. WOW!! My, My, My!! When did those years go by! The band has survived all the ups and downs of being musicians. I can honestly say that the years have been very rewarding to us. To live a life of music is a wonderful experience and a precious gift. To continue working with these amazing musicians is an honor.

Jazzreview: What was it like growing up in New Haven, Connecticut?

Airborne: Our hometown of New Haven is very rich in ethic and cultural diversity. Each member is unique and brings these diversities and backgrounds to create the jazz sound. Airborne has been praised as being a living spirit of musical brotherhood.

Jazzreview: What was Airborne’s first rehearsal like?

Airborne: Even in the early years of the band, there was a real commitment to create good jazz music. Many comments of the band were that no one ever stood in the background. Each musician contributed to the sound of the band. An Airborne performance always showcases the talents of all the musicians but still keeps the integrity of the composition. That was always present even in the early years.

Jazzreview: When was Airborne’s first show and what was it like?

Airborne: 1990, in our hometown of New Haven at the legendary Toads Place. We performed with Tower Of Power. The place was jamming and such a funky good time. We were received with such respect and an overwhelming response, FOUR encores!!

Jazzreview: What was the band‘s musical direction in those early days?

Airborne: The jazz band started with both originals and classic R&B tunes. Even from the beginning, the band’s sound has been jazz with Latin and R&B flavor. I think the first tunes we recorded were ‘Rips CafĂ©’, ‘No Restrictions’, and ‘Passion’.

Jazzreview: Who came up with the name of the band and why did it fit?

Airborne: Greg Borino came up with the name. Airborne describes something in flight and constant movement.

Jazzreview: What keeps the members motivated to stay in the band?

Airborne: We love the process of each new recording project and release. The intervention of ideas, the collaborations of musicians creating the jazz sound that is Airborne today. Bringing life and love to each new composition. Keeping faith and watching the growth in the band’s material and popularity.

Jazzreview: How have the band members changed over the years?

Airborne: I think over the years, we have developed into better musicians and humanitarians.

Jazzreview: When did everyone in the band begin playing their instruments?

Airborne: Everyone started private lessons on our instruments from age 12 years old and up and all of us have studied music in college.

Jazzreview: Who are some of the musicians or bands that you have made friends with or recorded tracks for?

Airborne: Laco Dezci, Earl Whitaker, Yvette Early, Thomas Mitchell, Chris Geith, Keith Outlaw, etc. We have recorded and produced for artists of many different genres - jazz, R&B, and Gospel.

Jazzreview: Why does the band stay with the indie record label Tilt?

Airborne: I guess the freedom of recording and producing our own CD’s. It is easier to create without restrictions. The music will then become the first priority. We input and decide the marketing ideas. So the right message and the music become one and easier to communicate. We have a vision on how our music is represented. We look for people of humility to be on board to help our career and cause.

Jazzreview: How did the band get involved in the Arts Education Program with the Connecticut Commission of the Arts?

Airborne: We support the Arts. We are on the New England Foundation for the Arts and the Connecticut Commission on the Arts performing (on their) arts touring rosters. We bring ‘A Century of Jazz’ Arts in Education program into the schools. A demonstration of a variety of jazz forms and styles supported by a historical narration, a musical insight, a question and answer session, and an inspirations workshop. This program instills a positive attitude and direction towards musical and social growth. The no limits approach combined with a structural musical less plan illustrates the value of jazz education in our society.

Jazzreview: What are your thoughts about these music education programs?

Airborne: Jazz education is very vital for our newer generations. Teaching thoughts of imagination, personal expression and self-discipline to help them achieve whatever goals they dream. Emotions soar high in young hearts and jazz music gently provides an enrichment and fulfillment to their wandering passion. Jazz is a true American art form.

Jazzreview: On the band’s myspace site, you posted an email from a fan named Corey Woodard who wrote that he is stationed in Afghanistan and really enjoys jazz music. How did the note make the band feel and is Airborne scheduled to do a USO Tour?

Airborne: That email was an emotional cry for a touch of home by a US service man who loved our music serving in the ‘Forgotten War’ Afghanistan. We shipped a few copies of all our CD’s to the troops. The Turbulence CD has just been released and airplay is just beginning. Our next step is to set up a tour promoting the CD. No USO Tours are planned, but who knows. Our hearts go out to all these men and women in harms way.

Jazzreview: What is your impression of the Internet?

Airborne: We are true internet believers. It makes the world a smaller place. It has helped us promote our music all over the world. The music of Airborne reaches out to everyone in our crazy world. Airborne is multi-cultural and international.

Airborne - Turbulence CD - Review Smoothjazz.com

Airborne is a band with a mission… the multi-cultural contemporary jazz group from New England takes flight with their 5th release TURBULENCE setting the objective on using their musical energies for calming an otherwise disruptive world.

In the CD liner notes, the band invites listeners to open their hearts, minds and souls to the music… Music that is, in our opinion, delightful, lively and filled with life featuring hot rhythms, sizzling saxophone and flute, infectious bass lines and caressingly soulful vocals that are effectively woven into the mix.

This is Airborne’s critically acclaimed recipe for jazz fusion. The Connecticut band’s music is genuine and big-hearted… joyful jazz… healing and enriching, just as you would expect from these humanitarians and educators.

TURBULENCE is anything but with its high-spirited, soothing melodies. Tracks like the sophisticated “Smooth Sailing” and the jubilant “Festival at Sunset” bring to mind the sonic qualities of other multi-cultural ensembles such as Fattburger and Pete Escovedo’s Orchestra. This stylish collection of songs also features soul-stirring pieces such as the head-boppin’ “Can’t Fight Love“ as well as songs of great depth like the captivating tune “The Message.”

What the world needs is more people who do what they love to do with purpose and confidence
and because they love doing it…

Airborne’s TURBULENCE, filled with nine original compositions, is the perfect remedy for chaos.

Sandy Shore - Smoothjazz.com

Airborne - Turbulence CD - Smooth Jazz Now - Review

Airborne is quite a unique smooth jazz ensemble. The New Haven band was formed in the late eighties and has since then crossed the "turbulences" of our agitated times. Airborne is more than a jazz ensemble. It is a group of dedicated musicians, who share the same cause and philosophy: bringing peace, love and tolerance to our world through their music. They have stuck to this belief since their beginning and have opened up their music to multi-culturalism.

As the band puts it in the CD liner notes: "Our world is overflowing with physical, emotional and political distress and confusion. Let this wonderful music help open your heart to life's beauty. We can all make a difference in this world of need. If we try to help, support and understand, we can achieve peace."

Airborne's fifth release "Turbulence" conveys a spirit of peaceful serenity, openness to the world's musical cultures and high energy to create a positive vision for the future. The band entails talented members: 6 experienced musicians and a soulful female vocalist. Musically speaking, "Turbulence" successfully adds world rhythms and sounds to an already lively and passionate smooth jazz sound.

This exciting musical expedition starts with the exultant Latin "Festival Sunset". Then you embark on a soft mid tempo cruise led by a crew of great musicians: Steven Clarke on bass, Gregory Borino on guitars and Thomas Sonsone on saxophone ("Smooth Sailing"). When you come back on earth, you will be received by Elisabeth Dellinger's soulful voice in a groovy tune ("Can't Fight Love"), remembering Shakatak's unique sound.

Then you will follow the steps of
North America's first inhabitants, Native Americans ("Native Search"). After a tonic big band swing ("Hillside Swing"), listen to the powerful "Drums of Peace/Awakening" introduced by African rhythms and chants. Later on, let yourself invited to a Brazilian samba ("As We Journey") and get inspired by the sensual R&B voice of Elisabeth Dellinger. Eventually this bright journey comes to an end with an emotional smooth jazz piece, "The Message."

When listening to this stunning and graceful CD, you will notice that this ensemble plants musical
"seeds of peace" and uses music to help make our dream of a better world come true.

Turbulence is a great musical achievement. So, let yourself be guided by these "musical peacemakers."

Akbar Nour - Smooth Jazz Now

Airborne - Turbulence CD - Smooth Jazz Therapy - Review

When in 2005 I reviewed the album ‘Heavy Vibes’ from the smooth jazz and fusion band Airborne I suggested that they were re-igniting genuine old school jazz fusion in a way that was part Tower Of Power, part Ambrosia and very much in the spirit of 5th Dimension. Now New Haven, CT based Airborne are back with their fifth CD release ‘Turbulence’. It retains much of the excellent fusion that grabbed attention the last time around and widens horizons to demonstrate huge empathy with the music of many cultures.

In fact the entire collection is a rollercoaster ride of moods and emotions, writing credits are shared between band members Greg and Thomas Borino, Thomas Sansone, and the superb vocals of Elizabeth Dellinger are at the core of all its best moments.

The hugely expansive ‘Festival At Sunset’ is fuelled by Airborne’s hallmark horn driven sound
and ripples with pleasing Latin grooves. Those same luscious tones and that same Latin intensity are equally prevalent for ‘As We Journey’. Soulful, and with a gospel message buried within, the track is illuminated by the amazing voice of Elizabeth Dellinger and as the band continues to show its versatility they find, in ‘Hillside Swing’, a big band vibe that is uniquely Airborne.

Although ‘Smooth Sailing’ is as melodic and ‘in the pocket’ as its title suggests it might be the complexity that the band often engenders is never too far away. ‘Native Search’ draws clear influences from Native American rhythms while ‘Drums Of Peace / Awakening’ bristles with an African inflection every bit as potent as Lamont Dozier’s seminal ‘Going Back To My Roots’.

The song’s message is delivered in a hugely accessible way and this accessibility is again to the fore with ‘What About Love’. Totally typical of what Airborne do best, the band takes its time to build this smoldering ballad in a way that others might not but, in doing so, produce a track of genuine substance.

Tight, edgy and spliced with wonderful backing vocals, ‘The Message’ could be a synonym for everything that Airborne represents and the band stays in soulful mode for ‘Can’t Fight Love’. Here sumptuous horn riffs abound and the luscious vocals of Elizabeth Dellinger again portray just how influential her input invariably is.

In the final analysis, ‘Turbulence’ is a fresh and eclectic mix that is well worth discovering.

Denis Poole - Smooth Jazz Therapy

Airborne - Turbulence CD - Review - The Urban Music Scene

This crew is in flight & they are dynamic!

Exquisitely from
New Haven, CT., This crew releases their 5th CD of choice to the Contemporary Jazz Crowd with a little Urban flair in the mix. It reflects on a societal note of worldwide news & differences to the matter of heart & soul. The music in jazz from these players connects the dots to what you hear in the environment today. Especially to those seeking reminisce to the original Contemporary jazz game & the music it speaks for!

From the beginning of "Festival at Sunset" rips the Latin smooth jazz melody already heard of in the smooth jazz community. Nothing new there right? Well comes..."Smooth Sailing", which doesn't so much go technically according to the name of the title. It does have several different elements added to bring the choice of tune more-so to Contemporary Jazz Status! Like the vocal scats laced throughout that track! When you go to "Can't Fight Love" & hear the congas go smoothly with the vocals, you can almost grasp a feel for the UK's 'Brand New Heavies' & a midday R&B tempo from USA's group 'Seek'. Or you should know by now that both parties DO mix!

"
Hillside Swing" picks up a speed towards a big band camp & does the twist to a little straight ahead jazz flow. Possibly to flex muscles of the band on their ability to dabble in both arts of the game. "Drums of Peace/Awakening" glided my listening path into fully appreciating what they came to play - down to earth Jazz! I mean, they wasted no time in this composition. The sax play coming directly from Thomas Sansone comes through & is truly felt. In fact, this track reminds me of another 'awakening' in the debut CD from Ramsey Lewis's "The Urban Knights"! (Remember Them?)

For independent artists such as them, their true testimony may ride into their consistency & passion for music in this project. The overall feel! It speaks loudly throughout the CD & yes....It’s Recommended!

The Urban Music Scene - Terrill J. Hanna

Airborne - Turbulence CD - Review - Jazz Review

Airborne’s fifth album, Turbulence meets all your expectations of what you imagine an eminent jazz album would be like. The songs are symbolic of contemporary jazz, progressive jazz, and the alluring smooth jazz. Produced by band members Greg Borino (electric/acoustic guitars), Thomas Borino (piano/keyboards/vocals), and Thomas Sansone (saxophone/flute/vocals), the album is made up of a 6-part instrumental unit and one part female vocals furnished by Lady Elizabeth Dellinger.

The songs take the listener from a balmy R&B idling to contemporary swing and club jazz proportions. Rounding out the 6-part instrumental are Dean Kosh (drums), Asher Delerme (African/Latin percussion), and Steven Clark (bass). The band employed a number of additional musicians for Turbulence which surprisingly does not add clutter to the tracks. Moreover, these additional musicians came in as needed to add sunspots of trills and flounce that tickle the melodies with a wider array of hues and party atmospheres.

Tracks like “Festival At Sunset” and “As We Journey” propel a Latin-jazz samba ruffling up the rhythms with alcoves of animated horns. The rotating cycles revolve around the springy vocals in a pleasurable spin. The R&B/Soul tides on numbers like “Smooth Sailing” and “Can’t Fight Love” are intoxicating as Dellinger’s sensuality and magnetism on “Can’t Fight Love” resonates with a Regina Bell vocal shower.

The citrus-sweetness of the flute swirls on “Native Search” are symphonic and tranquilizing while
Hillside Swing” has ringlets of elevating guitar intervals and swing-laden horns. “Drums Of Peace/Awakening” turns into waves of smooth jazz horns embellished with African textured beats, rippling hand shakers, and syncopated vocal chants. “What About Love” has a touch of cocktail-jazz in its R&B voicing illuminated by Dellinger’s singing, as the sinuous grooves and honeyed tones of “The Message” stoke the embers of the sonically romantic flames.

Though Turbulence has only 9-tracks on it, the average length of the songs is 6-minutes which is double what most 11-track albums offers in there songs. Airborne have produced an album that is a portrait of jazz music’s charms and supple movements making music that is idealistic and proofed for party mixers.

Airborne’s Turbulence gives jazz music a very good feel.

Susan Frances - Jazz Review

Airborne - Turbulence CD - Review - ContemporaryJazz.com

Airborne is the type of group and Turbulence is the type of recording that represents what I love about contemporary jazz – it’s like unwrapping an unexpected gift and discovering,
for the first time, something you like but didn’t know existed.

It never ceases to amaze and at the same time perplex me – the sheer talent and
originality of jazz artists. This is good stuff - check it out!

John Luciano - Contemporaryjazz.com